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Aristotle, Feser, Aquinas, and Finality

Ever since the days of Bacon and Newton philosophers and scientists have bothered themselves with determining the material and efficient causes of various objects and events. They, as a matter of course neglected, ignored, and repudiated the use of the concepts of formal and final causality. That was a brief summary of a truncation of …

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Advice Sermons and the Gospel

Below is an exercise, not in critiquing the author’s post, per se, but rather critiquing a set of assumptions he makes that lead, inexorably, to the material in his post. His assumptions about what constitutes gospel, what it means to preach Christ, and what “the law” is in the New Testament are disputable on the grounds …

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St. Maximus the Confessor, Greek, and Love

Lately I’ve come across several citations of an ancient work, “The Four Centuries on Love.” It means four series of one hundred meditations upon love. The work is by a St. Maximus the Confessor. He is a favorite theologian among the Greek Orthodox. He lived from 580-662 ad. who wrote on various topics: Christology, a …

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David Bentley Hart, Rene Descartes, and my own Cartesian Intuitions

In his new book The Experience of God: Being, Consciousness, Bliss, David Bentley Hart notes that during the medieval era almost nobody thought that “the relation of soul and body was anything like a relation between two wholly independent kinds of substance: the ghost and its machine (which for what it is worth, was not really Descartes …

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The Middle Ages, Theology, and Science.

Several months ago I wrote a review of the book Superstition. Thinking back to numerous of its claims one in particular came back to mind. Park stated often that when Christians believe in God in prevents them from doing science because they already know that God made it, therefore nobody has to ask any questions. …

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Why not read Barth?

Based on a link posted in the comments at Jim’s blog I found a supposed source for Barth-less pride.  The apparent source of people not wanting to read Karl Barth a post by Janice Reese at this blog. People who used her post to excuse intentional ignorance misunderstood her point. She notes, with all the sincerity I …

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The Right Way to Disagree

Doug Wilson wrote a post entitled “Believing One Half of the Wrong End of It.” In it he notes:  A careful opposition to Calvinism, say on the contentment question above, would say something like Calvinism ought to be Stoicism, given the critic’s understanding of the premises, and it is therefore a matter of great curiosity that it …

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What does Acts 2:42 mean?

A favorite verse of Scripture for many (and rightly so) is Acts 2:42. After a whole bunch of people get baptized Luke writes, “They were devoting themselves to the apostles’ teaching and to fellowship, to the breaking of bread and to prayer (Act 2:42 NET).” But what did this look like? Was it disorganized hanging …

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George Romero, Showbread, and Being Married

Warning: post uses Zombie imagery. If that grosses you out then too bad or don’t read it. Note: I do not write this post to secretly reveal any personal problems, but only to reflect upon the nature of marriage, a favorite song, and the Biblical text. One of my favorite bands since 2004 has been …

Bible, Christianity

Redeeming Self-Love

For the Christian, there is a right and wrong way to love yourself or your own life. One can disqualify you from being a disciple of Christ: If anyone comes to me and does not hate his own father and mother and wife and children and brothers and sisters, yes, and even his own life, …