Month: September 2018

Music, Culture

Two Visions of 2070

Of the two, neither is good. But both are entertaining: The first is somewhat controversial, but it’s essentially a guy giving a ted-talk as a ridiculous caricature of certain segments of the college type. For instance, he voices his (not real) support of euthanasia with this line, “In 2070, there won’t be any old or …

Links

Hitting the Links 9/10/2018

Here’s a good Ed Latimore quote: Passive-aggression is weak. It tries to get the benefits of confrontation at a steeply discounted price. If you have something on your chest, speak directly and leave no room for misinterpretation. — Ed Latimore (@EdLatimore) January 6, 2018 Of everything I’ve cooked lately, this is my wife’s favorite: 5 …

Education, Mindset, Philosophy

What is a Spiritual Exercise?

In What is Ancient Philosohy?, Pierre Hadot argues that ancient philosophers were offering ways of life that eschewed the pull of the passions and instead aimed at optimal human existence (happiness or ευδαιμονια).   In order to accomplish this, philosophers weren’t just offering arguments or proposing ideas just to change people’s ideas, they were trying to help …

Pedagogy, Philosophy

The Lindy Effect and Classical Education

Schools purporting to offer a classical education are cropping up around the country. Is this recent trend good or bad? To answer this question, I propose that classical education is Lindy-compatible, and therefore minimally not harmful, but likely helpful. Here is Nassim Nicholas Taleb‘s description of the Lindy effect: “Lindy is a deli in New …

Christianity, Culture, Spiritual Life

The Christian Hope and Homo Prospectus

The Christian version of the afterlife is unique in two respects. It is so unlike our present existence that the Bible says that it can only be seen dimly and is best expressed in images. But it is very much like our present existence in that our present self will be preserved and will have …

Links

Links to Read: 9-3-2018

I stumbled upon Scripture, revelation, and Platonism in C.S. Lewis by Andrew Walker. I finally had time to read it today. The first 15 pages or so are pretty good. In them, he describes Lewis’ six categories of revelation: the numinous, Sehnsucht/desire, conscience, Israel, pagan dreams/myths, and Jesus himself. After that, Walker attempts to critique …