Tag: education

Writing, Dialectic, Education

Arthur Whimbey on Intelligence as a skill

Arthur Whimbey’s definition of intelligence: “Intelligence in an attentional/processing skill used in analyzing and mentally reconstructing relations. The distinguishing feature of this skill is breaking down complex relations (or problems) into small steps that can be dealt with fully. The major components of the skill are extensive search and careful apprehension of all details relevant …

Culture, Education, Mindset

Intellectual Weakness

Nobody wants to be weak. Weakness leads to losing. Weakness leads to resentment.[1] Intellectual weakness is perhaps the most subtle weakness. It compounds itself. Physical weakness makes us feel bad. Intellectual weakness makes us feel smug or leaves us unable to see our weakness. There are many ways to overcome this problem, but the first …

Education

Grammar: The First Art of the Trivium

Introduction The first of the liberal arts is grammar. The Trivium Trivium is shorthand for three skills:  grammar, logic, and rhetoric. Together with arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, and music they make up the liberal arts. In the current year, a liberal arts degree is simply a degree in reading texts and critical theory. What is Grammar? …

Basics, Education, Pedagogy

Quick-Sand Memory: Lecture to the Wall and Beyond

Introduction Many young people are challenged to study harder to succeed, but very few of them are given any helpful guidelines for studying. Below are two helpful study techniques and one piece of research that support them. Lecture to the Wall “The Overnight Student” by Michael Jones which can be found here. The book is …

Book-Review, Education, Pedagogy, Psychology

Book Review: Stuart Ritchie’s Intelligence: All that matters

Stuart Ritchie, Intelligence: All That Matters. (Hodder & Stoughton, Kindle Edition 2016). As an educator and leader, I try to stay up to date on research into personality and human potential. But sometimes I cannot keep up with recent findings. Stuart Ritchie’s new book helped fill the gaps. Dr. Ritchie is a post-doc researcher at …

Uncategorized

John Calvin on Good Teaching

In a remarkable little comment on Paul’s first letter to the Corinthians, John Calvin made these remarks: Imitators of me…Paul had [in the previous chapter] there brought forward his own example in confirmation of his doctrine. Now, in order that the Corinthians may understand that this would be becoming in them, he exhorts them to imitate …

Intellectual Virtues

On Pedagogy: Transmission and Revision

I’ve written a few posts that overlap with themes concerning education. But I think that, over all, good education has this main goal: it supports human happiness. Of course, everything humans do is “for happiness,” just like every arrow is aimed at a target. But like arrows, decisions and processes can miss their mark. Education …

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On the Liberal Arts

I’ll say more about this topic later. Articles periodically pop up about why it is still important to major in the liberal arts and not bother with STEM fields. And then other articles will pop-up saying that liberal arts degrees are stupid and essentially put the individual student in debt without concern for said student’s …

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New Job or Learning by Doing

I recently got a job as a software developer/computer programmer. This is weird for several reasons. One of which is that when I was in high school, one of my goals prior to being thirty was to become a computer programmer to pay for seminary. I just did it in reverse. The programming I’m doing …

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Epistemology and Practice: Thoughts

One of my chief interests in philosophy has always been epistemology. I even wrote a really bad paper in high school about whether or not one could know religious truths (it has thankfully been lost to the sands of time). For those who do not know, the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy defines epistemology as Defined …